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Debi Fischer is a nurse at the University of Miami surgical oncology step down unit. Prior to that she worked in orthopedics and neurology for many years. In addition to her nursing experience, she has earned a master’s degree in social work. Becoming a Licensed Clinical Social Worker was a lon-sought-after goal which she finally attained. She is a caregiver for her family and her dogs as well.

YouTube Training for Nurses

YouTube videos can help oncology nurses learn how to do clinical procedures and brush up on their skills.
PUBLISHED: 8:00 PM, MON JANUARY 28, 2019
After a busy night on the surgical oncology step-down unit, I finally sat down to catch up on my computer charting. When I looked over, I was surprised to find my co-workers engrossed in a YouTube video showing the latest in plastic surgery. This was an actual case showing breast implant surgery. They were learning about it online, for free, at their convenience.
 
Many student nurses consult YouTube to help them learn how to do clinical procedures and to help them brush up on their skills. It is an invaluable resource. While many of my fellow nurses are new or recent grads, I am learning that nursing school is radically different now than when I attended, and that it has changed for the better.   

Since that busy night, I have discovered a variety of YouTube channels that are available for nursing care. The channel RegisteredNurseRN boasts more than 450,000 subscribers and covers a range of topics like diagnosis of clinical conditions such as shock, how to survive in nursing school, and how to prepare for nursing entrance exams. There are also videos explaining the pathophysiology, management, and nursing interventions for different types of shock. We discussed these same topics decades agopre-YouTube
so, some things never change.  

Since I wanted to find out about YouTube in relation to oncology nursing, I discovered that the Oncology Nursing Society has a YouTube channel featuring videos by Donna Wilson, RN, a clinical nurse specialist who is also a personal trainer at the Integrated Medicine Center at Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital, showing  nurses how to get patients moving in order to avoid fatigue and muscle weakness associated with cancer. Other videos feature archived videos of full sessions given at the annual congress and more.

I remember my early days of nursing school. I wish YouTube had been around then to help vanquish my fear. YouTube can only enhance the nursing school experience and one’s career down the road.  

For more information on YouTube videos that Oncology Nursing News® has to offer, visit our sister publication, OncLive®’s channel, OncLiveTV.
 

Talk about this article with nurses and others in the oncology community in the General Discussions Oncology Nursing News discussion group.
More from Debi Fischer, MSW, BSN, BA, LCSW, RN
All too often, I get off the elevator to work on the surgical oncology acute care unit and am witness to an increasingly familiar scene.
PUBLISHED: Mon April 01 2019
Being an oncology nurse is not always an easy job, but here are 3 things that keep me inspired.
PUBLISHED: Fri February 15 2019
Here are some things nurses can do to prepare patients to adhere to their treatment regimens once they leave the hospital.
PUBLISHED: Thu January 10 2019
This year, I’ve made 3 New Year’s resolutions that I know can help make me a better nurse.
PUBLISHED: Thu January 10 2019
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