Ellen T. Matloff on Genetic Recommendations for BRCA1/2 Carriers

April 1, 2014
Ellen T. Matloff, MS, CGC
Ellen T. Matloff, MS, CGC

Ellen T. Matloff, MS, CGC is a certified genetic counselor and the president and CEO of My Gene Counsel, a company that provides updating, scalable digital genetic counseling for consumers and clinicians. Matloff founded the Yale Cancer Genetic Counseling program, served as its director and a faculty member at Yale School of Medicine for 18 years, and was a lead plaintiff in the SCOTUS BRCA gene patent case of 2013. She works closely with patient advocates in the areas of genetic counseling and testing, and direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing, and is an expert in return of genetic test results and interpretation of genetic testing. Matloff serves as the Forbes.com contributor on genetic counseling, genetic testing, and digital health.

Ellen T. Matloff, MS, CGC, director, Yale Cancer Genetic Counseling Program at the Yale School of Medicine/Yale Cancer Center, discusses options for BRCA1/2 carriers who are looking to reduce their risk of ovarian cancer.

Ellen T. Matloff, MS, CGC, director, Yale Cancer Genetic Counseling Program at the Yale School of Medicine/Yale Cancer Center, discusses options for BRCA1/2 carriers who are looking to reduce their risk of ovarian cancer.

Matloff recommends that all BRCA1/2 carriers should seek the advice of a certified genetic counselor. The counselor will sit down with the carrier and go over all of their mutations before conducting a four-generation, personal and family history assessment and going over all of their options.

If the patient has had 20 years of birth control pill use, for example, she’s already greatly reduced her risk of ovarian cancer, Matloff explains. A more personalized approached needs to be taken when discussing risk-reducing options, Matloff says.