Rudolph Navari on Traditional Treatment for CINV

Rudolph Navari, MD, PhD, professor of Medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine -South Bend, discusses traditional antiemetic treatment for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV).

Rudolph Navari, MD, PhD, professor of Medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine —South Bend, discusses traditional antiemetic treatment for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV).

A combination of a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, an NK1 antagonist, and dexamethasone alongside corticosteroids is traditionally used in patients receiving emetogenic chemotherapy. The combination is effective in controlling emesis, but has not shown efficacy in preventing nausea, Navari says.

Post-chemotherapy nausea can impair a patient’s ability to perform routine activities and reduce quality of life.

In a phase III, randomized, double-blind study, Navari added the antipsychotic drug olanzapine to the standard antiemetic regimen and found the combination was significantly effective in preventing both nausea and vomiting.

Olanzapine is currently only approved by the FDA as an antipsychotic.